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Are Your Kids Eating Well?

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A study to come out of Australia from the CSIRO has shown that only a proportion of our kids are eating and exercising well enough to be healthy now and in the future. Are yours?

Our children are our future and many of them are setting themselves up for terminal ill health before they have even started. The article goes on to say:

“UniSA Professor Tim Olds says about one quarter of the children surveyed were overweight or obese.

‘This number hasn’t increased over the last decade or so, and that’s encouraging but it’s still far too high,’ Professor Olds says. ‘Australian children spend very large amounts of time (3-4 hours a day on average) in front of a screen of some sort – TV, computer or videogame console. Swapping sedentary behaviours like TV watching for activities that get kids moving is a great step towards getting that number down.’

Project coordinator, Dr Jane Bowen of CSIRO’s Preventative Health National Research Flagship, says since the previous surveys there have been some big changes in the Australian way of life.

‘Many children are not eating enough nutritious food, which means they don’t get the vitamins and minerals needed during their growth years,’ she says. ‘Unfortunately fruit, vegetables and dairy foods are being replaced by foods high in kilojoules, salt and saturated fat – the very dietary patterns linked to the development of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease in adults.’

The head of the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at Flinders University Professor Lynne Cobiac, says the results for teenage girls are particularly worrying.

‘As a group, teenage girls appeared to be getting insufficient amounts of calcium from foods. Eighty percent of 14 to 16 year old girls did not consume the recommended amounts of calcium. Girls this age also reported doing the least amount of physical activity. These two factors combined put them at risk of developing weak bones as they grow older.’

Dr Bowen says the survey involved more than 4,400 interviews with children aged 2 to 16 years and their parents.” (Science Centric News)

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October 27, 2008 Posted by | Health, Nutrition, Wellness | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment