Balancenusa

We come to You: Massage, Beauty or Fitness

Are Your Kids Eating Well?

Pupils play dur...

Image by Getty Images via Daylife

A study to come out of Australia from the CSIRO has shown that only a proportion of our kids are eating and exercising well enough to be healthy now and in the future. Are yours?

Our children are our future and many of them are setting themselves up for terminal ill health before they have even started. The article goes on to say:

“UniSA Professor Tim Olds says about one quarter of the children surveyed were overweight or obese.

‘This number hasn’t increased over the last decade or so, and that’s encouraging but it’s still far too high,’ Professor Olds says. ‘Australian children spend very large amounts of time (3-4 hours a day on average) in front of a screen of some sort – TV, computer or videogame console. Swapping sedentary behaviours like TV watching for activities that get kids moving is a great step towards getting that number down.’

Project coordinator, Dr Jane Bowen of CSIRO’s Preventative Health National Research Flagship, says since the previous surveys there have been some big changes in the Australian way of life.

‘Many children are not eating enough nutritious food, which means they don’t get the vitamins and minerals needed during their growth years,’ she says. ‘Unfortunately fruit, vegetables and dairy foods are being replaced by foods high in kilojoules, salt and saturated fat – the very dietary patterns linked to the development of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease in adults.’

The head of the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at Flinders University Professor Lynne Cobiac, says the results for teenage girls are particularly worrying.

‘As a group, teenage girls appeared to be getting insufficient amounts of calcium from foods. Eighty percent of 14 to 16 year old girls did not consume the recommended amounts of calcium. Girls this age also reported doing the least amount of physical activity. These two factors combined put them at risk of developing weak bones as they grow older.’

Dr Bowen says the survey involved more than 4,400 interviews with children aged 2 to 16 years and their parents.” (Science Centric News)

live a balances life

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

October 27, 2008 Posted by | Health, Nutrition, Wellness | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Belly Fat May Affect Your Liver

Central obesity

Image via Wikipedia

Look down… is your belly fat or flat? If all you see is a rounded ball where your abs ought to be you might want to consider doing something about it. A new study has found that abdominal fat, which is called WAT or while adipose tissue, is something worth shedding. Among its many other disagreeable effects on the body these researchers have found:

“A study by the University of Southern California (USC) suggests the release of lipids from abdominal fat, which drains directly to the liver, increases overnight, providing additional insight as to how abdominal fat is associated with type 2 diabetes risk. The results of the study were presented at an oral session Monday, June 9 at the American Diabetes Association 68th Scientific Sessions held in San Francisco.

“It has been shown that people who store body fat in their abdomens are at greater risk to develop diabetes and other chronic illnesses, but why this happens has remained unclear,” says Lisa Nicole Harrison, B.S., Master’s candidate, at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and lead author on the study. “Our study found lipid release from abdominal fat was substantially elevated during the night, which may be a primary mechanism leading to insulin resistance, a strong risk factor for type 2 diabetes.”

The observed lipids drain directly to the liver, a key center of glucose and insulin metabolism, where they may accumulate as triglyceride and cause dysregulation of these important metabolic processes, Harrison says. The results highlight the importance of abdominal obesity in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.”

University of Southern California (Physorg.com)

What can you do about it? The book “A Rainbow on My Plate” might have some of the answers.

Zemanta Pixie

June 11, 2008 Posted by | Health, Nutrition, Wellness | , , , | 2 Comments